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On the Edge    Jan 10 - Feb 9, 2013

Ember #5
Matt Devine
Ember #5, 2012
 
Tidbit  #75
Babette Herschberger
Tidbit #75
 
Tidbit #69
Babette Herschberger
Tidbit #69
 
Tidbit #7
Babette Herschberger
Tidbit #7
 
Tidbit #76
Babette Herschberger
Tidbit #76
 
A Seat at the Table
Charles Christopher Hill
A Seat at the Table
 
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Opening Reception Thursday January 17, 6-8 pm

Felipe Barbosa, Steven Baris, Sarah Bednarek, Matt Devine, Jon Elliott, Caio Fonseca, Angela Glajcar, Babette Herschberger, Charles Christopher Hill, Mitch Jones, César Paternosto, Ivan Stojakovic, Jeremy Thomas.

On the Edge is a group show of artists who explore pattern, line, and shape in complex formations. A stable sense of space is altered within a seemingly structured format. Geometry, patterns in nature, mathematics, measuring systems, altered perspective, and chance manipulation have a presence in the work of these artists.
Soccer balls are deconstructed and re-sewn into Felipe Barbosa’s work. He repurposes the existing logo and object into new patterns of color and shape. In a way, he is unraveling consumerism and branding, giving it a freedom and new life, changing an old pattern. Steven Baris combines spatial tension with a fluid motion in his compositions. A refreshing spatial attitude rests within a complexity of structure in his paintings. Pattern and mathematical equations are prominent in the sculptures of Sarah Bednarek. “Hyperbola for BG”, is based on the geometric curves having two parts that mirror each other, resembling two infinite bows. Materials such as melamine, canvas, and plywood are combined with bold colors to give planar life to these mathematical equations. Matt Devine’s steel sculptures use systematic repetition and controlled minimalism to sooth and quell an internal struggle. The strength of the steel contrasts with the delicacy of light, shadow, and latticework. Jon Elliott’s paintings and ceramic wall installations shift the fickleness of light and shadow patterns into angled, solid shapes that create a new movement and become unchangeable imprints of time. Caio Fonseca investigates the relationships between elements, tones, contrast, and proportion in his paintings. He starts with a structure based on the golden section and then improvises, adds and subtracts paint in a spontaneous way, building with curves and straight lines. Angela Glajcar tears white paper in succeedingly smaller round shapes that create a portal or cave with no visible end. The fragility of the paper is abandoned leaving accumulation, volume, and light to project a sense of strength and solidity.
In her Tidbit series, Babette Herschberger shapes, bends, and paints found cardboard into geometrical studies. Her focus on process and color transforms the banality of the original object into a complex intersection of plane and edge. In between the bands of color in the vibrant and rich paintings of Charles Christopher Hill lay intimate areas of intricate, minute colors. The edge of one space leading into the next is not as clear as it may seem. Mitch Jones paints thick stripes over collages of vintage documents, ledgers, and pages from books and encyclopedias. He is concerned with their shift of importance and meaning over time. The expanse of white space with rectangles of color wrapping around the edges in Cesar Paternosto’s paintings focuses the attention away from the frontal and makes the painting more of an abstract object. The open central space is simultaneously flat and full. Paternosto, a vanguard of abstraction in Latin America, has been compared to such artists as Piet Mondrian. Ivan Stojakovic deconstructs mass produced wood panels to reveal the honeycomb patterned support underneath. In pieces such as “White Out”, his process of cutting, breaking, and excavating represents a means to expose hidden social structures, mass production, and any unauthentic residue. Jeremy Thomas manipulates steel in his sculptures into forms that look as though they could be inflated. Air pressure and volume are explored with painted and rusted steel planes that softly burst.

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